2017 Portland Fruit Beer Fest

I haven’t blogged in a while (apologies) but festival season is upon us! This past weekend was the Portland Fruit Beerfest, which due to other obligations and just life in general, was the first Fest my wife and I attended this year. We missed Spring Beer and Wine and Nanofest which was unfortunate, since those are a couple of our favorites, but there’s always next year.

My wife and I like to volunteer to pour beer at these festivals, which is you haven’t done it before, it’s the best way to do a fest.  You “work” for 3-4 hours, pouring samples and taking tickets/tokens and then you are released from your shift and given a cup, tokens and wristband to go enjoy the festival, for free! One of our friends from the homebrew club is the volunteer coordinator for a couple of fests in town, including this one, so of course we signed up. Sometimes it can be boring, sometimes it can be hectic, usually it’s a combo of both.  A sudden burst of activity followed by a lull, rinse, repeat. A few festival require you to have an OLCC Servers Permit (Oregon Liquor Control Commission) but most don’t.  Usually they just have a pamphlet that tells you how to determine if someone has been overserved and then you sign on the dotted line that you solemnly swear you’re up to no good.

They moved the Fruit Beer Fest this year, back to Burnside Brewing, compared to the last couple of years at the North Park Blocks, and I get the reasons why (cost, access to water, electricity etc) but it did make for a smaller, more crowded venue.  That’s typical beer fest, but it still stinks.  The good news is it gave me an opportunity to visit Burnside Brewing after I shockingly realized I’d never been there.

Fruit Beer Fest can be interesting.  Most of the beers are small, one off batches made specifically for the fest with some wild flavor combos.  I tried 13 unique beers at the festival, counting my samples, my wife’s samples and one last one that we split.

In no particular order, we had:

Blueberry Lemonade – HiWheel Fizzy Wine
Fruitlands Blood Orange and Hibiscus – Modern Times
Pineapple POG – Portland Cider Company
Key Lime Pie – 10 Barrel Brewing
Hop Berry IPA – Culmination Brewing
Clown Pie, Banana Cream Ale – Portland Brewing (I poured this one)
There will be Blood (Blood Orange IPA) – Fort George
Kumquat Farmhouse Ale – pFriem
Biere Royale – The Commons
Tiki Club IWA – Sunriver Brewing
Orange Crusher – Cascade Brewing (one of the best of the day!)
Cherry Pilsner – Reubens Brews
Benny Appleseed – Lompoc Brewing

Quite the assortment yeah? Some are better than others, welcome to beerfests, but they are all interesting and unique.

Next June I would highly recommend it.

How much is too much?

The other day I bought a bottle of Modern Times City of the Dead Export Stout with Bourbon Barrel aged coffee beans.  Modern Times just got distributed to this area, so this was brand spanking new, a holdover from a release party a couple days prior.  It was $7 for a 22oz bomber.  When I got home I remarked to my wife what an amazing deal that was.  Man, have times changed.

Long gone are the days of $6 six-packs.  Granted, when I was paying that price I was buying macro beer like Miller Lite, or faux-craft like Blue Moon and Shock Top.   Now that I live in Oregon, you can’t get ANYTHING for a dollar a bottle.  16 oz Pabst tallboy will set you back two bucks.  I’m OK with that.  Good beer is worth paying for.  But how much?

The first time I dropped $20 on a 22oz bomber was for Ninkasi’s Ground Control Stout.  This was an imperial stout with cocoa and local Oregon hazelnuts made with yeast that had been grown in space! Yeah, I bought it for the geek factor, but it ended up being a really amazing beer.  Knowing what I know now about yeast propagation, that beer probably wasn’t as quite a small and limited run as I imagined it to be, but still a pretty rare release.

Grocery store beer is always going to be cheaper than beer in a bar (or it should be).  But it still helps to think of things in terms of pints.  Average price for a pint in Portland is about $5, give or take.   So you’re looking at about $3.75 for a 12oz or $6.88 for a 22oz scaled on a per ounce basis.   $22.50 is a hell of a lot for a six pack, so thankfully you get a pretty good deal on the 12 ouncers, which usually run $8-10 depending.  The 22’s not so much.  They hold pretty well onto the per pint price, running $6-8 depending on what it is.  Sometimes you catch a special on something for 3.50-4 bucks and so that’s a good deal.  I’ll think to myself when I’m going to buy something if I would pay for it on draft at a bar.  For Budweiser, no.  For Boneyard, yes.

As time goes on, we find things that we’re willing to pay for and that recalibrates our inner scale of what we think is a good price.  $10 for a 16 ounce bottle of Goose Island Bourbon County Stout? I felt that was a worthy price, so I bought some.  $25 for a 22ounce of Deschutes Black Butte 29th Anniversary? Yes, in my mind I feel like that’s worth it.  Learning what all is involved in barrel aging beer and making of sour beers and blends really helps put a value to the price you’re paying.  $14 for a 22oz bottle of New Belgium 2015 La Folie? After finding out what goes into making that beer, to me, that’s a steal! $6 for a 6 ounce draft pour of a blended lambic imported from Belgium? Sign me up.

Everyone has a limit though right? Even though it counteracts my pint argument from above (because it’s still under the $3.75/pint guide) I have to draw the line at Ballast Point.  I just cannot bring myself to pay $16-18 for a sixpack.  They are priced well above the rest of the market, with no one else at that pricepoint, I don’t understand how they sell a single bottle.  Then again, they just sold themselves to Constellation brands for a cool one billion dollars, so what the hell do I know? What also hurts is that I don’t like Ballast Point’s beers.  We only get a few of their brands up to Oregon, and the one that is the most popular, Grapefruit Sculpin, in my personal tastes, is disgusting.  Way too bitter, lots of pithy grapefruit peel rather than fruit, and from what I’ve heard it’s not even real fruit.  To me that’s not worth paying for at any price.  If you like it, knock yourself out.

The other side of this coin is a conversation I recently had with a coworker about how “if you got into homebrewing to save money you’re going to be disappointed”.  I got into homebrewing for the science and creativity.  My favorite part is formulating recipes.  Can I buy beer for cheaper than I can make it? Yes of course, but the key factor is the quality of the beer in question.  My last batch of CDA cost me around $10 a gallon, or about $1.25 a pint. (This does not account for my time or equipment costs, this is ingredients only)  This is a 7% ABV beer with a ton of flavor and lots of hop aroma.  This is “craft” beer.  What can I buy on the market for that price or cheaper? Miller Lite, Coors Light, PBR etc.  4% ABV beers with no flavor and no hops. So homebrewing might not be cheaper, but it’s a better value.  I get more bang out of my buck by making my own.

What’s your limit?

2017 Festival of Dark Arts

I thought I had done a review of this last year, but apparently I didn’t.  This is the second year my wife and I have attended this festival, which is based around only stouts.  Fort George Brewery in Astoria has declared February as Stout Month and hosts this festival every year in the middle of the month.  Last year it was Valentines weekend, this year it was slightly later.  Unfortunately it always seems to fall on Zwicklemania weekend, which means missing that event.

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Last year’s festival happened during a torrential downpour and we got soaked walking from our hotel to the festival.  This year the weather was much nicer, but the downside to that meant it was a lot more crowded.  They rearranged some of the tap locations in an effort to manage the crowds better, but I feel like they went the wrong way and made it worse instead of better.  But besides the crushing crowds and the too loud music (which we just come to expect at an event like this) everything else was top notch as usual.  And of course, we’re all there for the beer!

I don’t take detailed tasting notes at an event like this, but there were quite a few that stuck out as far superior than the rest.  Between my wife and I we tasted 26 of the stouts that were there.  That’s only a third or so of the 63 total available.  Several of the more rare ones run out fast, some we never even saw, and sadly my wife had the dubious honor of blowing two kegs.  She just missed out on the Firestone Walker Parabajava and the Smog City The Nothing.  I was a few people short of The Breury’s So Happens it’s Tuesday, which I knew would go fast.

Quite a lot of the beers at the Festival are barrel aged and double digit alcohol level.  This is one of the few fests where I’m thankful for a 3 ounce pour, because most of these beers it would be hard to drink much more than that.  Thick, rich, boozy, heavily flavored, just a “taste” is perfect.

It’s impossible to pick a favorite, but there were a handful of beers that shone above the rest.  The Lagunitas Willett Whiskey Aged Stout was phenomenal, as was the Ecliptic Bourbon Barrel Aged Oort Imperial Stout.  It’s a coin flip between those two for best of the fest.  Also great was the 2013 Walking Man Bourbon Barrel Jaywalker, the Alesong Rhino Suit, Sierra Nevada Barrel Aged Narwhal, the Stoup Rye Barrel Aged Imperial Stout and the Mill City Brew Werks Raspberry Tripwire.

When I’m at a festival like this, I tend to gravitate to beers I’ve never had before and beers that I can’t usually get in this area.  Nothing against Boneyard’s Suge Knight or pFriem’s BA Imperial Stout, but I’ve had them before and I know they are good.  This also means I didn’t try a lot of the Fort George beers, since I’ve had them before or know I can get them pretty much any time.  Coffee Girl, Kentucky Girl, and Tuesday’s Lunch I know I’ve had, and the rest didn’t really look appealing.  Nothing wrong with weird flavors, but I’m not sure about a stout with Candy Cap mushrooms (Subtle Hyperole) or black tea and plums (Kaiju Stout).

The exception to this was Fort George’s new Matryoshka series.  Named after Russian nesting dolls, the base is a Barrel aged Russian Imperial Stout.  A small batch of that was aged with cocoa nibs, and then an even smaller batch of that was aged with cocoa nibs and raspberries.  A stout, within a stout, within a stout.  I had a bottle of the base beer here at the house, and my wife got a taster of the cocoa version while I got a taster of the cocoa/raspberry version and they were both phenomenal.  The day after the festival we went back to Fort George for lunch and also a bottle release of the Matryoshkas.  I picked up a bottle of the cocoa nib and the cocoa nib/raspberry to complete the set.

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Fort George sure knows how to throw a party! We have to leftover tokens to kick start us for next year.  See you in 2018!

Into the Woods Part 2

My recent infatuation with barrel aged beers has continued.  The season of dark beers is almost over, but February in Oregon is Stout Month and that includes the Festival of Dark Arts this weekend at Fort George in Astoria.  My wife and I went last year and declared we would return every year.  Whether that holds true or not remains to be seen, but we are going this year.  There’s a lot of barrel aged beers on the menu for the fest this weekend, but until then, here’s a couple more I’ve enjoyed in the last couple of months.

Payette Brewing Hoop and Stave 3 (2014): Imperial Rye Ale aged in Whiskey barrels with cherries.  So, this was a very interesting beer.  I read several check-in’s on Untappd claiming the beer was infected.  It was a bit sour, I believe possibly from the cherries and may have picked up some natural bacteria as well.  Personally, it tasted like a Kriek (cherry lambic) and I really liked it, but it may not have been what the brewers intended.  Your mileage may vary.  (4 stars)

pFriem 2016 Bourbon Barrel Aged Imperial Stout: As soon as I heard about this beer I had to find a bottle of it. Dark black with a coffee colored head, dark fruit and strong oak aroma.  The bourbon really bursts in the flavor plus vanilla and coconut flavors from the oak.  Dark roast in the aftertaste.  Very smooth.  Very dangerous at 11.5% (4.5 stars)

New Holland Dragons Milk: I’ve read that this is the only barrel aged stout that is part of a year round lineup rather than a special seasonal.  New Holland recently started to distribute to Oregon, so when I saw it I had to grab a bottle.  Dark fruit and strong bourbon aroma.  Slightly sweet with a chocolate and whiskey flavor.  Not roasty, very smooth.  Thick mouthfeel that lingers long on the palate.  I remember this beer being very intense, almost too much so.  Certainly could have shared the 12 oz bottle.  (4.25 stars).

New Belgium Transatlantique Kriek (2016): Fruited lambics are my favorite style of sours, particularly cherry lambics (kriek).  This beer is a partnership between NBB and Oud Beersel in Belgium.  The lambic portion was brewed and wood aged in Belgium and then shipped across to NBB where they blended it with a golden lager and their own sour brown ale, Felix, and then aged in the foeders.  I tasted this at the tasting room in Fort Collins, but it is available in 22oz bottles.  Lightly tart, sweet cherry, very refreshing, not overly sour, but just enough pucker. (4.75 stars)

New Belgium 2017 La Folie Sour Brown Ale: I’m pretty sure I would have liked this beer regardless, but I got to taste this in New Belgium’s Foeder Forest as part of the tour.  I know words don’t do it justice but imagine drinking a sour beer, surrounded by the massive barrels it was aged in, in a room that smells like red wine and whiskey.  Got that? Definitely the highlight of the tour.  (4.5 stars)

Diebolt Vladislav Bourbon Barrel Aged Russian Imperial Stout (2017): This one might require some travel, since I don’t know if they distribute much outside the Denver area, but it’s worth the trip.  We missed the release by one day while we were in Denver, but when we got there the next day they had the original version plus several variants.  Sweet dark fruit, sherry, chocolate aromas.  Roasty coffee, dark fruit flavor.  Dry finish with lingering bitterness, super smooth. Absolutely blew me away.  Another dangerous one at 11%.  (5 stars)

Diebolt Vladislav BBA RIS Variants, Coffee Chocolate and Vanilla Chai (2017): We tried two variants of the Vladislav while we were there as well.  My wife really enjoyed the coffee chocolate, which was a little coffee heavy for my personal taste, but execution-wise was nearly flawless, very well done. (4.25 stars).  The Vanilla Chai knocked my socks off.  Sweet and spicy with great flavor, certainly hides the alcohol very well.  You could drink a lot of this if you weren’t careful. (5 stars).

Denver Brewery Tour

Earlier this week, my wife and I went to visit friends in Denver, Colorado.  Despite being a beer mecca, we initially planned on picking one or two can’t miss places and not make it all about just beer.  Our friends on the other hand, had other plans.  First, they booked us a spot on the New Belgium brewery tour, which you have to book well in advance.  Then, for Christmas they brought us a Denver Pub Pass, which awards the bearer with a free drink at 20 locations around town.  Knowing full well we couldn’t hit all the places, we planned our adventure for four days to hit the ones that we could and then we left behind the Pub Pass for other friends to take advantage of it.

We managed to hit 15 locations and I logged 87 samples on Untappd.  A full 2/3 (or more) of those were simply a single sip, but that still counts as “tasted”.  I’ll give a brief description of each place and one of the standout beers from the tastings.

Seedstock Brewing (Denver): The first place we went was walking distance from our friends house.  Their new “local” if you will.  A small place, but good beer and a friendly staff.  A very nice start to the trip.
Standout Brew – Barrel aged scotch ale

Black Shirt Brewing (Denver): Another favorite of our friends haunts, this place had a hopping bar with some really interesting artwork.  The staff went out of their way to find a hidden keg of something that was no longer on the menu but still available.
Standout Brew –  Box of Boom Belgian Triple IPA

Crooked Stave @ The Source (Denver): This tap room in a former metal foundry turned restaurant and shopping space had a cool vibe.  Unfortunately, the beer was good but the experience not as good.  The paper menu listed about 20 beers, with a couple stamped as sold out.  But when we got to the bar they only had about 6 things on tap.  The servers were very short with us, telling us we could get what we wanted in a bottle, but we wanted a 3oz taster, not a 750ml bottle.  We speculated they may not have been prepared to be running out of beer on a busy Friday night, so I’ll give them a little benefit of the doubt for being frantic.
Standout Brew – Blueberry Origins (Barrel aged blueberry sour ale).

Great Divide Barrel Room (Denver): One of two locations in town for Great Divide, the Barrel Room is right across the street from the source.  Smallish bar, but nice view of the brewery/barrel storage areas and all kinds of interesting one off beers to try.  Interesting experience of how addition is not always a good thing.  The Chocolate Oak Aged Yeti was quite good, but honestly the regular plain Yeti was better.
Standout Brew – Yeti Imperial Stout

Cerebral Brewing (Denver): The first stop on day two was this geeky science themed brewery.  The taproom is pretty awesome, all the names of the beers are science related, and the beer is pretty good to boot!
Standout Brew – Alternative Facts “0 IBU” Double IPA

Fiction Brewing (Denver): Continuing the geeky themed brewery is this book themed brewery.  A tap room full of books and beer styles (not just names) inspired by famous books.  Ranging from Moby Dick to Harry Potter and everything inbetween.  Great location right on Colfax (one of Denver’s main drags) and great staff.
Standout Brew – Malice and Darkness Russian Imperial stout

Lost Highway Brewing (Denver): Just down Colfax a ways from Fiction is Lost Highway.  I’ve seen their stickers around, so I recognized the logo in the Pub Pass and wanted to give it a try.  Nice spacious taproom with a nicely varied taplist.  Some lagers and lighter beers to balance out the big double IPAs and stouts.
Standout Brew –  Longest, Wickedest Wit

Joyride Brewing (Edgewater): Another one really close to our friends house, they had good beer and a great burger food truck outside, but the taproom was really, really loud.  I had a hard time hearing my wife sitting right next to me and that gets really tiresome really fast.  They allow dogs, and seem very friendly, just maybe visit at a less busy time than Saturday night.
Standout Brew – The Crooked Collusion Imperial Red Ale

Hogshead Brewing (Denver): The final stop of day two, we almost skipped it, but I’m glad we didn’t.  The taproom was very hip and modern for a place that serves older English style beers, but they had a decent list to choose from.  About half on cask and half on carbonation.  This ended up being some of the best beer of the night, so glad we stopped by!
Standout Brew – Double Chin Wag ESB

De Steeg Brewing (Denver): Day three we took it easy, but still managed to hit a couple places.  Tucked away, literally, in a back alley in the Tennyson Street neighborhood this place is eclectic.  Beer styles ranging from Dutch “House beer” and Saison, to American style Black IPA and a brandy barrel aged Belgian Quad that mostly just tasted like brandy (not a bad thing).
Standout Brew – Dry hopped Saison

Call to Arms Brewing (Denver): Just down Tennyson Street from De Steeg, Call to Arms is themed around family crests and Coats of Arms.  Dark wood and metal, tables made out of barrels.  Another place that was hopping on a Sunday afternoon and quite loud, but they had a good selection of beers.
Standout Brew – Amigos Borrachos Vienna Lager

Diebolt Brewing (Denver): The final stop for day three was a place our friends raved about, and with good reason.  Great variety of beers and we happened to be there the day after they released a barrel aged Russian Imperial stout that was incredible!
Standout Brew – Vladislav Barrel Aged RIS (and the Vanilla Chai Variant)

New Belgium Brewing (Fort Collins): Day four we ventured up to Fort Collins for the New Belgium tour before we headed back to the airport.  If you haven’t taken the New Belgium Tour I highly recommend it! It’s an awesome, 90 minute tour with 4 free beer samples.  They gave us a taste of La Folie Sour Brown ale in the room with all the foeders that they age the sours in.  That was one of the coolest parts of the tour.  That room smelled like red wine and whiskey.  They have a really impressive facility and a very environmentally conscious and employee well-being focused way of doing business.
Standout Brew – 2016 Transatlantique Kriek (Lips of Faith)

Odell Brewing (Fort Collins): Around the corner from New Belgium is another large player in the beer world, Odell Brewing.  We didn’t have time for another tour but they have an awesome wood and stone taproom and had a food cart outside with brats and sausages from the grill.  They have several different flights available and we tried the Classic flight and the Local flight.
Standout Brew – 90 Shilling Scottish Ale

Left Hand Brewing Co (Longmont): We had time for one more stop between Fort Collins and the airport and Left Hand fit the bill very well.  A very cool taproom space and great selection of beers, including their well known Milk Stout.
Standout Brew – Left Hand Milk Stout

So there you have it, a whirlwind tour of the Denver area beer scene, and we barely made a dent.  I don’t know when and if we’ll make it back to Denver, but there’s always more beer out there to try!

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Best of Craft Beer Awards 2017

Last weekend I had the honor of judging the 2017 Best of Craft Beer Awards in Bend, Oregon.  I had been invited last year, but wasn’t able to make it due to a prior commitment (judging another competition actually).  This is the fourth year of the competition, which has steadily grown.  Wanting to recognize craft brewing but use actual blind judging rather than a people’s choice or “best of” list, similar to GABF and World Beer cup, is the goal of the event.  Based on shipping and judging location the contest was heavy with Pacific Northwest and California beers, but there was a good number from the Midwest and East Coast, including a couple from North Carolina.

The judging was held at the Mt Bachelor Resort in Bend.  The weather was cold, but the hospitality was quite warm.  They fed us breakfast and lunch both days during the judging and took care of pretty much anything else we would need.

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This was my first experience in judging commercial beer and it was both similar and different to judging homebrew.  The first way that it was different was instead of one sample at a time, they brought us flights of ten to twelve all at once.  They also had very short, checklist style scoresheets.  No long winding feedback here, just a few words and on to the next sample.  It was rapid fire judging.  The beers with obvious flaws were weeded out right away and then we would debate amongst the good ones which deserved to move on to the next round.

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The second major way it was different was the sheer number of styles.  The BJCP recently updated their style guidelines up to 32 styles, but this competition uses the Brewers Association styles (same ones GABF uses).  The BA has over 160 styles, which if you’re curious you can find HERE. These guidelines are much more narrow than BJCP, and since this is commerical beer a lot of it is based on alcohol percentage and IBU (bitterness), something that is usually not known for homebrew.  For example, two of the styles I judged were American Style IPA and American Style Strong Pale Ale.  What’s a Strong Pale Ale you ask? Well, that’s a beer with slightly more alcohol and bitterness than a Pale Ale, but not as much as an IPA.  Plus some overlap.  Confused? Without being told, these two styles would be indistinguishable, but Strong Pale Ale ranges from 5.6%-7.0% Alcohol and 40-50 IBU, while American IPA ranges from 6.3%-7.5% alcohol and 50-70 IBU.  Stuff like Pliney the Elder at 8.0% and 100IBU? That’s a different category.

Beyond that it was pretty much just like judging homebrew.  Taste the beer, give it a score, write some feedback, move on.  One of the things several people remarked to me as a similarity to homebrew was that there would be just as much bad beer as good.  Shockingly they were right. It startled me how many of the beers were bad, and I don’t just mean low quality or something I didn’t like.  These beers had serious production flaws that indicated they had been rushed, not given enough time, bottled too soon or crashed (chilled) too soon.  Off flavors like diacetyl and acetaldehyde that the yeast will eventually get rid of but it needs time.  On the first day I judged 49 samples, most of them before lunch.  Thankfully the second day I only judged 16.

After the judging, they brought out the half empty bottles (which would get dumped anyway) so that we could taste some of the samples from categories we hadn’t judged and also see the labels and find out what we had just judged blind.  Some people would match up entry numbers and walk around with a bottle letting people try it and saying “This took first place in stout, you gotta try it!” I took a few sips of things, but realized quickly at the end of the first day that I was “beered-out”.  No matter what bottle I picked they all started tasting the same.  Starting the day on IPAs and finishing with sours, my palate was wrecked.

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Just as a demonstration of the widespread nature of the competition, I went back and looked at my Untappd check-ins over the course of the two days and I logged 25 unique beers from 12 different states.  Representing Wisconsin, Alaska, Mass., Colorado, California, Oregon (of course), Minnesota, Texas, Missouri, Washington, Nevada and North Carolina.  Counting the bottles I took home, you can add Ohio and Alabama to that list as well.

There were at least 12 members of my homebrew club, the Oregon Brew Crew in attendance as judges and stewards so there were plenty of people I knew there.  Other none OBC judges I recognized from other competitions as well.  You start to get to know people when you see them 6-7 times a year.  That’s the fun part of being a judge!

At the end of the event was what had enticed a lot of people to make the trip, the bottle grab!  Commercial breweries often send twice the amount of beer needed for a competition, for fear of breakage, spillage, etc, so there was a lot of unopened bottles left at the end.  Since the beer was donated for samples it can’t be resold and is expensive to ship back, so rather than dump it down the drain, they lay out the boxes and let the judges have at it!

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A lot of people took home three and four boxes worth, but I decided that I didn’t need that much at home, and to try to move it, carry it all wasn’t worth it, so I limited myself to one box and tried to be very particular about what I picked.  I’ve tried about half of them and they’ve all been good. So far all winners.

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My small, but impressive, personal haul.  Beers from all over, including California, North Carolina, Alabama, Colorado, Washington and more. The two cork and caged bottles are Sugar Creek from Charlotte.  I visited there on our massive east coast trip a year ago, so I had to grab those when I saw them.  Can’t get those out here normally for sure.  The wax topped bottle is a Bourbon barrel aged Stout, so I managed to snag at least one “fancy” beer as well.

Overall, this was a great event and I had a lot of fun.  The first day felt like “work” based on the sheer number of samples, but otherwise it was OK.  Looking forward to doing it again next year! The 2017 awards results are posted HERE.

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The Beer Collector

Most beer, the grand majority in fact, is designed to be drunk fresh.  Some beer, like fresh hop beers are best when they are literally just a few days old.  The moment a beer leaves the brite tank it starts to age.  Oxidation, hop aroma fades, malt flavors morph.  Some aging is good, yeast still in suspension continue to eat up compounds that make off flavors like diacetyl and DMS.  Most beer I would guess is probably at its peak after packaging about 2 weeks to a month and then it starts to go downhill.

Some beer however, does benefit from some age.  People debate and argue about what beers are good to age and which aren’t but a few common themes do emerge.  Dark malts tend to hold up better, so stouts, porters, barleywines tend to age well.  Also lower hopped beers, since the hop flavor and aroma tend to leave pretty quickly and you’re left with just bitterness.  IPAs do NOT age well.  Trust me.  Higher alcohol beers also tend to hold up to age.  In fact, a little oxidation can take away some of that rough burn from that 14.5% Russian Imperial Stout.  These beers almost NEED age to even be drinkable.  Bottle conditioned beers (like Belgians and Trappists) with yeast still in the bottle hold up well to age since the yeast will continue to scrub out the oxygen in the bottle and prevent oxidation.  Sour beers with non yeast cultures in them will do the same thing.  Aging will also mellow some of the harsh acidity of some sours.

Through mostly good fortune, I’ve begun to amass a very small (emphasis on small with our tiny apartment) beer cellar.  Most of the bottles have been gifts, judge prizes, raffle prizes etc but a few were purchased.  Some I set away to age on purpose, some I actually forgot about and recently discovered but they all have a few things in common.  Most all of them are barrel aged.  They already have some oxidation from the barrel, so they aren’t really going to get “worse” in the bottle.  Most of them are stouts or barleywines.  Most of them are high alcohol.  So they hit all of the criteria I mentioned above.  Will they all age well? Who knows.  I guess that’s part of the risk/reward circuit of it.

One beer that I do not have in my cellar but I would highly recommend is any vintage of the Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout.  Yeah, I know, they are Evil Empire now, but all the more reason to find one of the older vintages if you can.  I’ve had the good fortune, through friends, to taste both the 2006 and the 2009 vintages.  The 2006 I don’t recall being overly fantastic.  I’m sure it was still good, just not mindblowing.  The 2009 on the other hand blew me away.  It tasted just like a fresh 2014 I had at a release party 2 years ago despite being 7 years old.  Black Friday (BCS Release day) is coming up next week and I’m hoping I can get my hands on a bottle (or two? dare to dream) but I’m not holding my breath. (UPDATE: I went out on Black Friday and was able to procure some BCBS Stout.  I was able to get 2 bottles of the base stout, one bottle of barleywine and one bottle of coffee stout.  Stay tuned for reviews/tasting notes on those).

If at all possible, one of the recommendations I’ve heard the most is to buy two bottles of something you intend to age.  Drink one fresh, drink one a year from now.  See how it does, how it changes.  Of course the trick is remembering how it was a year ago.  You can take notes, but I’m not sure that would convey all of the sensory characteristics.  I’m excited to actually try this with a beer my wife and I both received as a judge prize at a competition.  The Ecliptic Belmont Station 19th Anniversary Barrel Aged Barleywine.  Since we got two bottles of it, I put one in the fridge and hid one in the closet.  One to drink now and one to hold.  Released on March 20th of 2016 this beer already has a good six months under its belt.

Another reason I’ve been holding on to some of these beers is because they are fairly special and I want to wait for the “right time” to break them out.  Of course, there’s not going to be some magic time that all of a sudden my brain is like “Hey let’s break out the Deschutes Black Butte XXVIII”.  I’ve realized with a few of them that the moment we break them open it becomes a special occasion.

Some of the beers I’m currently holding onto include:

2014 Firestone Walker Velvet Mirken (Barrel aged Oatmeal Stout)
Deschutes Black Butte XXVIII (2016)
Deschutes Collage II (2016)
Sound Brewery Old Scoundrel Barleywine (I think from 2014?)
Ruse Multibeast Brett Saison (2016)
10 Barrel 16 Barrels Pinot Barrel Aged Golden Ale (2013, pre InBev)
Cigar City Puppies Breath Porter (2014)

Quite a few of these were gifted/purchased already with some age on them, so I probably won’t hold them for much longer and I don’t have any fresh to compare to, but that’s partly the inspiration to beginning to build up the cellar.  Now that I have some aged beers in my collection I can try my hand on aging myself in the future.  There’s quite a few releases this time of year that I hope to get my hands on a couple bottles, again one for now, one for later.

I’ll do my best to take good notes and post some reviews on here when some of these special beers get uncorked.  I’m gonna start making up “special occasions”.

Cheers!